NCHCPL Reader

Friday, March 31, 2006

Spring Break @ Your Library

Staying home for Spring Break this year? There’s lots to do at New Castle-Henry County Public Library.

Teens are invited to participate in an art contest, with the winner announced during National Library Week at 6 p.m. as teens get ready to “get down” and “chow down” at the DDR Tournament and Pizza Taste-Off. This party is planned for April 6 from 6 to 8 p.m. For those outside of the teen scene, DDR stands for Dance Dance Revolution... a popular game matching dance moves on a special footpad connected to a game system.

There are several activities planned in the Children’s Library, too. On Monday, enjoy a funny movie in the story room at 2 p.m. Snacks will be provided.

Kids ages 8-12 will kick off Piggy Poetry Month during library week. On Wednesday, April 5, at 3 p.m., the Piggy Poetry activity will include a pig hunt, Jack Prelutsky poems and a craft.

Stop in at the Children’s Library on Saturday, April 8, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to make an Easter Craft.

Story Time for ages 3-kindergarten will continue during National Library Week at 1:30 on Tuesday and 10 a.m. on Friday. Toddler Tales will be offered on Saturdays at 10 a.m. in April.

Adults can join a club just for them... the Bestsellers Book Club. The club will have its first meeting on Tuesday, April 4, at 6:30 p.m. in the Jennings Meeting Room to discuss S is for Silence by Sue Grafton.

Friends of the Library will host a special book sale on Saturday, April 8.

Visit www.nchcpl.org for more information about these and other programs.

Piggy Poetry


The Children’s Library is celebrating National Poetry Month with “Piggy Poetry,” a series of programs for ages 8 through 12. The “Piggy Poetry” series will take place at 3 p.m. on Wednesdays in April. Programs include crafts, pig hunts, Jack Prelutsky poems, “pigericks” and more. Children must be registered in order to participate in this free program.


To register for activities in the Children’s Library, log on to www.nchcpl.org, call 765-529-0362, ext. 366, or visit the checkout desk at the Children’s Library.

Wednesday, March 22, 2006

Library Dishes Up Culinary Mysteries


It’s a genre that grows in popularity every year: the culinary mystery. New Castle-Henry County Public Library is celebrating culinary mysteries with a special meeting of the Cookbook Club on Thursday, March 30, at 6:30 p.m. in the library’s Jennings Room.

Those who enjoy food and a good mystery are encouraged to pick up a book from the list of authors available at the main desk or share from a book they have read in the past. During the activity, participants will be asked to share what they liked about their selection and their favorite culinary mystery recipe.

The culinary mystery genre began in the early 1980s with the popularity of The Cooking School Murders by Virginia Rich. Culinary mysteries are generally light-hearted, with less emphasis on violence and more emphasis on food. Many culinary mysteries include recipes.

The Cookbook Club at New Castle-Henry County Public Library is informal and welcomes new members, even if they only want to come to one meeting. There are no dues, commitments, or responsibilities involved with the club, which is designed for people who enjoy cooking and/or eating.

The April meeting of the Cookbook Club will be a Chili Cook-Off. Participants are invited to bring a pot of their favorite chili to share. The Chili Cook-Off will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 26, in the library’s auditorium.

For more information about the Cookbook Club, contact Hope Gwinn, Programming Coordinator, at 765-529-0362, ext. 310, or via e-mail at hopeg@nchcpl.lib.in.us.

Friday, March 17, 2006

Spring Activities Planned for the Children’s Library

Spring has arrived at the Children’s Department at New Castle-Henry County Public Library. A variety of activities are planned for all ages. Unless noted, activities will take place in the activity room in the Children’s Library.

Spring Story Time for ages 3 through kindergarten is offered on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. and Fridays at 10 a.m. Story Time begins on March 21. Toddlers (ages 18 to 36 months) and their caregivers are invited to Toddler Tales. This story-based program will begin at 10 a.m. on Saturdays in April. Registration is requested for both Story Time and Toddler Tales in order to provide personalized materials for the participants.

The entire family is invited to Family Night Story Time on Tuesday, March 21, at 6:30 p.m. Registration is not necessary for this free program.


Children ages 7 through 10 are invited to join the Birthday Club at the library. On the month of their birthday, club members will be invited to a birthday party which will include other children with birthdays in the same month. The parties will be held on the third Saturday of every month from 10 – 11 a.m. Children who want to join the birthday club must be registered prior to the party day. The March Birthday Party is scheduled for Saturday, March 18.
The Children’s Library is celebrating National Poetry Month with “Piggy Poetry,” a series of programs for ages 8 through 12. The “Piggy Poetry” series will take place at 3 p.m. on Wednesdays in April. Programs include crafts, pig hunts, Jack Prelutsky poems, “pigericks” and more. Children must be registered in order to participate in this free program.

The Children’s Library is honoring National Library Week during April 2-8 with a variety of activities. On Monday, April 3, at 2 p.m., watch the hilarious family movie “Wallace & Gromit: the Curse of the Were-Rabbit.” Author Terry Reeves will present a program and book signing on April 6 at 6:30 p.m. in the library’s auditorium. Children are invited to stop by to make an Easter Craft on Saturday, April 8, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Registration is not needed for these programs.

To register for activities in the Children’s Library, log on to www.nchcpl.org, call 765-529-0362, ext. 366, or visit the checkout desk at the Children’s Library.

Monday, March 13, 2006

Lacy Presents Latest Book

For more than 45 years, Donald Charles Lacy has answered a divine calling. A calling to put words to paper and share those works with others. Lacy’s passion for the written word all started with an article for a professor at seminary and continues to flourish 1,000 published pieces later.

A weekly columnist for The Courier-Times, Lacy will share his latest book with readers during a program at New Castle-Henry County Public Library on Saturday, March 18, from 1 to 4 p.m. The program will take place in the library’s auditorium. Readers are invited to meet Lacy anytime between 1 and 4 p.m. At 1 p.m., Lacy will open with some short remarks. He will then be available to talk with readers and sign copies of his book.

Fast Food for the Soul is a collection of Lacy’s columns that take a common-sense approach to moral issues. In a fast-paced culture, Lacy’s writings offer sustenance for the soul and satisfaction for the spirit. This latest book contains 99 columns, with topics ranging from anger and despair to forgiveness and joy. Most columns begin with a story, often from Lacy’s own life experiences. His columns are in their eighth year.

Lacy spent his early childhood years in Henry County’s Stony Creek Township, and his first educational experiences were under the direction of teachers Marie Buell and June Stanley. His family’s connections to the area are deep, and most of his relatives are buried in Henry County. When he was a grade-schooler, his immediate family moved just across the line to Delaware County.

While Lacy has four earned degrees, he still calls himself “a skinny little timid boy.” His pulpit experiences took him from tiny towns such as Leesburg and large cities including Indianapolis. His works have been published in virtually every newspaper in the state of Indiana.

Lacy is technically retired, but his life is still filled with ministry opportunities. He supplies preaching at various churches and is currently serving at the Madison Street Methodist Church in Muncie. He spends time with people from other denominations, especially the Catholic Church, and is working to build bridges between Catholics and Protestants. He also speaks at seminars throughout the region. His next book will be a collection of sermons and is due for release in May. Lacy lives in Muncie with his wife, Dorothy.

Interacting with readers of his columns is an enjoyable experience for Lacy. He has done over 50 different events like the one at the library on Saturday.
“People are people. There are no uninteresting people,” he said. “Everyone can teach you something, but you have to be willing to learn.”